Technical Assistance Partnership for Child and Family Mental Health

Juvenile Justice Resource Series

Juvenile Justice Resource Series coverEach year, more than 2 million children, youth, and young adults formally come into contact with the juvenile justice system, while millions more are at risk of involvement with the system for myriad reasons [1, 2]. Of those individuals, a large number (65–70 percent) have at least one diagnosable mental health need, and 20–25 percent have serious emotional issues [3, 4, 5]. System of care communities face many challenges in working to better meet the needs of all of the children, youth, and young adults they serve. This resource series was developed to help communities address the mental health and related needs of young people involved or at risk of involvement with the juvenile justice system.

The TA Partnership contracted with experts in the field, including the National Center for Mental Health and Juvenile Justice (NCMHJJ), to author these briefs. Each brief examines a unique aspect of serving this population within system of care communities.

Featured:

Feedback Transition Age Youth With Mental Health Challenges in the Juvenile Justice System PDF

Zajac, K., Sheidow, A. J., & Davis, M. (2013)

Focuses on young adults of transition age (16 to 25 years of age), with primarily attention given to the 16 to 21 year age group who have a diagnosable mental health disorder, substance use disorder, and/or developmental disability. The authors examine evidence-based and promising practices, programs, and policies developed specifically to meet the needs of youth who are involved with justice.

Feedback Addressing the Mental Health Needs of Youth in Contact With the Juvenile Justice System in System of Care Communities (PDF)

Cocozza, J.J., Skowyra, K. R., & Shufelt, J. L. (2010)

Provides an overview of the challenges many system of care communities face in working with children, youth, and young adults involved or at risk of involvement with the juvenile justice system and provides examples of how some communities have overcome these challenges.

Feedback A Primer for Mental Health Practitioners Working With Youth Involved in the Juvenile Justice System

Kinscherff, R. (2012)

Provides an overview for mental health practitioners working with youth involved in the juvenile justice system, emphasizing emerging research and practices, the conceptualization of trauma and its impact on youth in the justice system, and implications for policy and practice. The author presents challenges and solutions for mental health professionals providing services to these youth.  

Feedback New Directions for Behavioral Health Funding and Implications for Youth Involved in the Juvenile Justice System

Cuellar, A. E. (2012)

Explores potential Federal, State, and private sources of funding to meet the behavioral health needs of youth involved in the juvenile justice system across the full spectrum of involvement. The author discusses important steps to improving access to and care for these youth, including the need for provider, youth, and family input into the reform process.

Feedback Screening and Assessment in Juvenile Justice Systems: Identifying Mental Health Needs and Risk of Reoffending

Vincent, G. M. (2012)

Explains why screening and assessment for mental health needs and risk of reoffending are critical for juvenile justice agencies and their partners when planning the most effective course of action for individual youth. The author explores a wide range of validated screening and assessment tools frequently used in facility- and community-based juvenile justice settings.

Feedback Successfully Collaborating With the Juvenile Justice System: Benefits, Challenges, and Key Strategies (PDF)

Shufelt, J. L., Cocozza, J. J., & Skowyra, K. R. (2010)

Takes a closer look at the importance of true collaboration between community-based child-serving agencies in providing a comprehensive array of services and supports and fostering positive outcomes for children, youth, and young adults involved or at risk of involvement with the juvenile justice system.

Feedback Systems of Care Programs That Serve Youth Involved With the Juvenile Justice System: Funding and Sustainability (PDF)

Skowyra, K. R., Cocozza, J. J., & Shufelt, J. L. (2010)

Explores ways in which communities can financially sustain the efforts they have in place to meet the needs of children, youth, and young adults involved or at risk of involvement with the juvenile justice system after the SAMHSA funding period has ended.

 

References:

[1] Puzzanchera, C. (2009). Juvenile Arrests 2007. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

[2] Puzzanchera, C. and Kang, W. (2010). Easy Access to Juvenile Court Statistics. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

[3] Shufelt, J., & Cocozza, J. (2006). Youth with mental health disorders in the juvenile justice system: Results from a multi-state prevalence study. Delmar, NY: National Center for Mental Health and Juvenile Justice.

[4] Teplin, L., Abram, K., McClelland, G., Dulcan, M., & Mericle A. (2002). Psychiatric disorders in youth in juvenile detention. Archives of General Psychiatry, 59(12), 1133–1143.

[5] Wasserman, G., McReynolds, L., Lucas, C., Fisher, P., & Santos, L. (2002). The Voice DISC-IV with incarcerated male youths: Prevalence of disorder. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 41(3), 314–321.